Governor marks one year of COVID-19


Staff Report



As restrictions imposed due to COVID-19 increased last March, customers flocked to stores to stock up, leaving shelves for items such as toilet paper and paper towels empty at Kroger in Swanton.

As restrictions imposed due to COVID-19 increased last March, customers flocked to stores to stock up, leaving shelves for items such as toilet paper and paper towels empty at Kroger in Swanton.


Drew Stambaugh | AIM Media Midwest

On Thursday, Ohio Governor Mike DeWine marked the one-year anniversary of the first confirmed COVID-19 cases in Ohio. He declared it a day of remembrance in Ohio in honor of the more than 17,500 Ohioans who have died from the disease.

It has also been a year since the lives of all Ohioans were drastically altered by the coronavirus.

Schools began closing their doors to students March 13 of last year after an order from the state. It started as a three week closure but eventually stretched to the end of the school year.

Remote learning and working from home became the new normal for people around the state, country and world.

And, those were just the beginning of the changes that made for a dramatically different normal before and after the start of the global pandemic.

A state of emergency was declared, many businesses were ordered to close, and new ways of doing business with minimal contact were found. Supply issues impacted stores around the country, with shelves that normally held hand sanitizer, disinfectant wipes, paper towels, and toilet paper left bare.

Mask wearing, social distancing, and hand washing were stressed repeatedly by health officials. Shortages of personal protective equipment for medical personnel were also a problem, especially early on in the pandemic.

“At each step, Ohioans have responded, first to ‘flatten the curve’ and give hospitals a chance to prepare, then by staying home, wearing masks, and social distancing,” said the day of remembrance proclamation signed by DeWine and Lt. Governor Jon Husted.

In the last year, there have been 3,864 COVID-19 cases in Fulton County with 63 confirmed deaths. The number of cases remained low until the fall, with daily case counts peaking from late November into December. All but six of the county’s COVID-19 deaths occurred after Oct. 1.

“At this one-year mark, it is important to remember and mourn those we have lost to this deadly virus, those who have become sick, and all of their families,” DeWine said in the proclamation.

As restrictions imposed due to COVID-19 increased last March, customers flocked to stores to stock up, leaving shelves for items such as toilet paper and paper towels empty at Kroger in Swanton.
https://www.swantonenterprise.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/23/2021/03/web1_Empty-shelves-2-.jpgAs restrictions imposed due to COVID-19 increased last March, customers flocked to stores to stock up, leaving shelves for items such as toilet paper and paper towels empty at Kroger in Swanton. Drew Stambaugh | AIM Media Midwest

Staff Report